Juicy Juicers

Champion Juicer review

I recently had the opportunity to test out the Champion Juicer on some of our garden greens and other veggies. It has a 1/3 horsepower 240 volt 50 Hertz motor and has several parts that help you make juice, nut and seed butters, ice cream and there is even a grain grinding attachment! The Champion was invented and went into production back in 1955 and has been made by the same family since then!

Champion Juicer Specifications

  • Stainless Steel motor shaft
  • 1/3 horsepower motor
  • All parts are 100% FDA nylon and stainless steel
  • Weight: 12 kg
  • Height: 25cm
  • Length: 43cm
  • Depth: 17cm

Juicing is a HUGE topic. I will try to boil down the juicing rationale to a couple of words: Extraction of all goodness from fruits and veggies, easy making of organic and homegrown ingredients (both juice and pulp) for recipes.

Believe it or not, many of us, having been raised on soft processed food diets, do not have the correct habits of chewing food long enough to properly start the digestion process. Further, some of the foods that have fantastic nutrients like the greens we grow in our gardens (and not even the “organic” ones in the stores grown on depleted Big Organic Ag farms) pass right through us without releasing their cell contents because our teeth and our gastrointestinal enzymes can not break the cell walls.

There are important considerations while juicing – minimizing oxidation (exposure to oxygen which degrades certain nutrients) and minimizing heat (heat kills Vitamin C and other nutrients).

Juicers like the Champion Juicer fracture the plant cell walls, releasing the cell contents into the juice. Those juices are the essence of the plant and should be used immediately to further insure against oxidation.

Short of working at -20 C in a Nitrogen enriched environment (to exclude oxygen), you can choose a juicer that minimizes both of these factors.

Things to keep in mind.

I have very much enjoyed getting to know this machine. For some people, who have had this juicer for decades, its all old hat. Other people may have multiple juicers and also find it all old hat. There are also a lot of people like me who have never tried out a juicer and can find it all sort of intimidating.

I have non-motorized hand-push citrus juicers and they are ok. My hands are dry to begin with and when I get citrus juice and the oil from the peel as I push down on it on my hands it stings terribly.

We had also bought this large bulky “juicer” for fruits and veggies. This one was made by Waring Pro and is the centrifugal type with a spinning basket.

It had limited use because the basket never extracted enough juice. The pulp was always VERY juicy but somewhat hard to get at in the catchment container. Once again, I was having to dig into acidic orange pulp or into soppy carrot pulp, etc, to try to then crush out, by hand, more of the juice. Lots of good juice was left on the table.

This is no small thing because the extent to which the juicer extracts liquids from the ground fruit or veggie is one of the major discriminators between juicers.

The Champion Juicer is called a centrifugal juicer by some but I think that is a misnomer. By no means is it analogous to the Waring Pro centrifugal juicer and there are MANY juicers out there just like the Waring Pro.

The Champion Juicer has a rotating screw that grinds and then forces pulp against a screen. Juice is separated from the pulp which is then ejected out the end. Centrifugal forces are not the main mechanism of action here.

I have found the Champion to be VERY effective at extracting juice from carrots, leafy greens, apples, oranges, and other fruits and veggies quite effectively the first time through the screw.

It Is VERY easy to feed the dry pulp back into the chamber as many times as you wish, to wrest the final microliters of possible juice out! You just hold your hand under the pulp spout, catch the pulp and then put it back into the feeder spout!

I am very happy to recommend this juicer with all thumbs up. Its a fantastic machine that absolutely gets the job done. Its also much easier to clean than the Waring Pro and similar juicers!

Let me know if you have any questions and also if you have any special ways you like to use your Champion Juicer!

Below are a series of photos I took while using the machine to make a spinach and carrot juice for some pasta I was making. I will include some details about how to assemble and then how to use the machine.

Champion Juicer review

(Motor unit without screw assembly, baggie protects oiled screw pin)

Champion Juicer review

(Between uses and before use, pin must be oiled (olive or coconut), I use a baggie and rubber band to keep oil clean)

Champion Juicer review

(Part – the grinding screw)

Champion Juicer review

(Parts – the juicing screen and the blank for making butters)

Champion Juicer review

(Parts – the feeder and screen holder)

Champion Juicer review

(Parts – screen holder)

Champion Juicer review

(Parts – feeder and part where grinding screw meets fruits and veggies)

Champion Juicer review

(Pin on motor that drives the grinding screw)

Champion Juicer review

(Oiling the pin)

Champion Juicer review

(Interior of the grinding screw, notice the flat edge in there, this matches flat edge on the pin on motor)

Champion Juicer review

(Feeding screw on, notice flat edge)

Champion Juicer review

(Screw on all the way, notice the two hooks or flanges on body of the motor)

Champion Juicer review

(Slip on the feeder with the bottom part facing you)

Champion Juicer review

(Put on the screen (or blank))

Champion Juicer review

(Screen holder has two little metal pieces on one end (magnets) that must butt up against the motor for the set up to work (called an interlock, is for safety))

Champion Juicer review

(Slide the screen holder onto feeder)

Champion Juicer review

(This is what it all looks like when on)

Champion Juicer review

(Slide the assembly a little ways off the pin, to clear those hooks)

Champion Juicer review

(Rotate the assemble forward so that the feeding shoot is near top. Align the opening on the assembly with the hooks on the motor body)

Champion Juicer review

(Push the assembly fully onto the pin, against the motor body)

Champion Juicer review

(Rotate the assembly to lock it into place)

These preceeding steps take a while to explain but hardly any time at all to actually do!

Champion Juicer review

(Put the juice container beneath the juice output part)

You are now ready to juice!

Champion Juicer review

Champion Juicer review

(Dont over stuff the feeding shoot, take it easy, its likely that your not an Iron Chef)

Champion Juicer review

(Juice comes out! You will need a LOT of spinach to make much juice, nature of the plant)

Champion Juicer review

(I was making carrot spinach juice)

Champion Juicer review

(Carrot Spinach juice)

Champion Juicer review

(Spinach pulp starting to come out)

Champion Juicer review

(Carrot and spinach pulp)

Champion Juicer review

(Dry carrot spinach pulp)

Champion Juicer review

(Feeding pulp back in)

Champion Juicer review

(Carrot spinach juice!)

To clean you just take it apart and flush all parts with warm water. You might want to get a vegetable cleaning brush to LIGHTLY brush the screw blades to remove any stubborn bits.

2 Responses to “Juicy Juicers”

  1. Amanda says:

    Thank you for all the beautiful pictures of the Champion! I’m planning to buy one and I was poking around the web trying to choose a color – black certainly does make this machine look modern and elegant, I was debating about it, but now I’m sold. And, I’m glad to hear that you love it as much as everyone else does – I’m going to be counting the days until mine arrives!

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